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Al-Manial’s Tragedy in Photos

Al-Manial’s Tragedy in Photos

[Residents of al-Manial march from Salahuddien Mosque with the coffins of people killed in the clashes. 6 July 2013. Photo by Jonathan Rashad] [Residents of al-Manial march from Salahuddien Mosque with the coffins of people killed in the clashes. 6 July 2013. Photo by Jonathan Rashad]

Hundreds of people, including supporters of deposed president Mohamed Morsi and residents of Cairo's al-Manial district, clashed for hours on al-Gamaa bridge on the night of 5 July 2013, using rocks, sticks, and guns. The chaotic scene started around 10 p.m., as Morsi's supporters were returning from a march nearby Tahrir Square. The violence dragged on for hours, as victims were being carried away to the hospital every few minutes, and as the terrifying sound of gunfire echoed through the streets. Twelve of al-Manial’s residents died in the clashes.

Their anger and agony was still visible the next day, when I went back to cover the funerals of al-Manial residents. Friends and relatives of the victims said they were willing to retaliate.

The events leave us all wondering: What should be done to stop the bloodshed?

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Vox Populi features popular artistic and aesthetic expressions that emanate from the Middle East. It seeks to highlight silenced and/or underrepresented cultural forms and conduits while challenging official and mainstream cultural production and narratives about the region. In addition to showcasing the independent work of ordinary citizens and groups—which includes street art, graffiti, popular non-commercial songs, hip hop, DIY YouTube series, etc.—the page aims to capture new and changing forms, spaces, and avenues of political socialization and mobilization. Through interviews, analysis, individual and institutional profiles, video snippets, films, music videos, and visual and street art, Vox Populi communicates and showcases important trends about/from the region that are often left out in what is otherwise serious analytical treatments.

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